2500 rolls of undeveloped film

Manheim, Hambacher Forst, November 2020

Oscillating wildly between fiercely claiming a position, a decisive point of view and rejecting it, aiming at position-less, becoming a machine of registration. And in between there is this wash-tub full of undeveloped film in the basement of Gary Winogrand’s house like some sort of Schrödinger’s Cat, an experiment that vanishes when realised. 

On March 19th 1984 Winogrand died at the Garson Clinic, Tijuana New Mexico. When Winogrand died the scale of his output was realised. According to Szarkowski, there was discovered, about 2500 rolls of undeveloped film, 6500 rolls developed but not proofed and contact sheets made from about 3000 rolls. Furthermore discovered processing rolls indicate that while in LA alone he developed 8522 rolls of film. The Garry Winogrand Archive established at the  CCP in 1983,  comprises of “over 20,000 fine and work prints, 20,000 contact sheets, 100,000 negatives and 30,500 35 mm colour slides as well as a small group of Polaroid prints and several amateur motion picture films”

https://web.archive.org/web/20120426010017/http://andygreaves.wordpress.com/2010/08/21/gary-winogrand/

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OPEN IMMEDIATELY!

Manheim, Hambacher Forst, November 2020

e Depot began to branch out of Georgia to Florida in 1981 with stores opening in Hollywood and Fort Lauderdale. By 1984, The Home Depot was operating 19 stores with sales of over $256 million. To enter the Dallas market The Home Depot acquired Bowater Home Center from Bowater Inc. on October 31, 1984, for $40 million.[12] The increased expansion of The Home Depot in the mid-1980s created financial difficulties with earnings falling at 42% and debt rising to $200 million. The financial difficulties of The Home Depot also caused the stock price to fall. To curb The Home Depot difficulties it opened only 10 stores in 1986 with a stock offering 2.99 million shares at $17 per share that helped The Home Depot to restructure its debts.[13] The Home Depot store in Markham, Ontario, Canada. In 1989, The Home Depot became the largest home improvement store in the United States surpassing Lowe’s. In the 1990s The Home Depot searched for ways to redefine its marketplace. An installation program for quality home improvement items such as windows or carpets was launched in 1991 called the EXPO with success. A 480-page book Home Improvement 1-2-3 was published in 1995. The Canadian hardware chain Aikenhead’s Hardware was acquired by The Home Depot in 1994 for $150 million with a 75% share. All of the Aikenhead’s Hardware stores were later converted to The Home Depot stores.[14] By 1995, sales reached $10 billion while operating 350 stores. Former General Electric executive Robert Nardelli became CEO and president of The Home Depot in 2000.[15] 2000–2007 San Diego maintenance and repair supplies company Maintenance Warehouse was purchased by The Home Depot in 1997 for $245 million.[16] Maintenance Warehouse was purchased because it was a leading direct-mail marketer of maintenance, repair and operations sup

— from Spam

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I Have a Plan in Place

Walking Project, Hafen 1, Mannheim, November 2020

 

Sean Hannity, one of the most trusted voices in media, confirmed the rumors are true.

Sean Hannity admits based on sources he has in DC, there is undeniable proof agents of the deep state have a horrifying plan in place.

— from Spam

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Is Form Beautiful?

Walking Project, Mannheim, October 2020

 

“Why is form beautiful?  Because, I think, it helps us confront our worst fear, the suspicion that life may be chaos and that therefore, our suffering is without meaning.”

— Robert Adams

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Demon, Chance, Love, and Necessity

 

The investigation begins with a citation from Macrobius’s Saturnalia to the effect that “four deities preside over the birth of every human being: Daimon, Tyche, Eros, and Ananke (Demon, Chance, Love, and Necessity).” He then turns to a work in which Goethe—an author who, incidentally, spent his life working on a sprawling multi-volume project (Faust)—takes up Macrobius’s list, expanding it to include Elpis (Hope). The five chapters of the work correspond to Goethe’s five figures, with Chance replaced by “Aventure” (Provençal for “adventure”) and Necessity by “Event.” Hence the reader must be familiar with two dead languages—Greek and Provençal—even to scan the table of contents, and the rest of the work shows the same breezy erudition for which Agamben is well known. Yet his fast-paced argumentation keeps the reader from getting bogged down, as every confusing or baffling point is quickly succeeded by a fresh idea or interpretation.

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The Fifth Side

Hafen 1, Mannheim , October 2020

Interviewer: What are the principal formal problems in your work?

Baltz: The edge. Quite literally, the major issue is the question of where to place the edge, what to include or exclude. A photograph is a five-sided flat object. In its construction those sides must be considered and referred to.

Interviewer: The fifth side?

Baltz: The frontal plane. The surface of the print acts as a reference for the space that the image occupies. The plausibility of that fictive space rests entirely upon the concern shown forthe print surface.

— from: An Interview with Lewis Baltz, Winter 1972

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Wall Piece

Wall Piece III, Mannheim, Oktober 2020

 

Wall Piece II, Mannheim, Oktober 2020

Wall Piece III, Mannheim, Oktober 2020

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photography is a device of human desire

Walking Project

We could discuss this in clinical terms. We know, for example, that the photographic device has obsessive-compulsive effects. The apparent ‘neutrality’ or ‘objectivity’ of the medium quickly turns it into a device that is driven by the anxiety that something is evading it: an obsession for registration and organisation, an obsession for information, documenting, cataloguing, systemising and creating hierarchies with respect to the apparent reality. On the other hand, due to the opportunities that photography offers to be there on the spot in any situation, it soon becomes invested with a hysterical desire: the cry for ‘reality’, ‘authenticity’, ‘intensity’, the demand that the image will take me to the very heart of the activity that it has registered. The image must fulfil me. We want the real thing and we want it now. The whole ‘human interest’ business that has been hollowing out the information sector for years, cultivates that hysteria.

— Frank Vande Veire, Blind Auto-Reflexivity: Dirk Braeckman’s Light on Photography

 

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